Ataturk Pavilion in Trabzon

posted in: Black Sea Region 16

While in Trabzon, I was desperate to see the the Ataturk pavilion, also known as Ataturk’s House (For those of you not familiar with Turkey, Ataturk was the man who led the Turkish war of independence, eventually leading to the formation of the Republic of Turkey in 1923).

About Ataturk’s Pavilion in Trabzon

Anyway, it transpired that Ataturk spent hardly any time in this house. A disappointing fact as this was also the case with the house of Ataturk in Kayseri. That turned out to be a friend’s house where he had only stayed for two nights.

This house in Trabzon was given to Ataturk as a present from the city. I cannot determine the true story of the house after his death as I heard three versions.

1 – Ataturk left it to the people of Trabzon in his will

2 – He left it to his daughter in his will

3 – Ataturk’s lawyers forgot to include the house in his will and it lay dominant for many years before the city of Trabzon opened it as a museum.

The house was built in 1903 and much of the furniture pre dates 1937. It is well kept and in excellent condition, so visitors get a good idea of domestic history at that time.

Ataturk Pavilion : Photography is Forbidden

Prior to going, I had learned from another writer that photography was forbidden and I considered this a major setback as I love to use photos on this blog.

I decided to hang the camera around my neck and sneakily take photos but I soon discovered that the sound of a camera clicking is magnified x100 in a quiet museum. I ended up with many pictures of the exterior but that is a shame because the interior is the most interesting.

If you are in Trabzon, do make an effort to see the Ataturk Pavilion. It only costs 2 lira to enter and is worth it,  despite the little time that Ataturk spent there.

If you cannot visit, look at the writers post about the house. She has photos of the inside!

Ataturk Pavilion Trabzon

Readers Question : How do you feel when photography is forbidden, especially now that most cameras have a no flash function?

[wp_geo_map]

Follow Natalie:
Hi. I'm Natalie, a freelance travel blogger and writer specializing in the country of Turkey. I love hot summer days, historical sites and coffee.

16 Responses

  1. Totally agree about the kiwis Ali and that is a very different scenario where I can understand the keepers concerns. Poor things!

  2. Ali
    |

    I love taking photos, so I generally get annoyed when they say no photography. I totally understand that the flash can harm things like artwork, and sometimes it’s easier to say no photography to make sure someone doesn’t accidentally have their flash on. When we visited the kiwis in Rotorua they didn’t allow photography because someone once took a picture with their flash on, accidentally, and it traumatized the kiwis and they didn’t eat for days. So that kind of stuff is understandable. The inside of a building though seems annoying. I’d probably want to see it more if I saw pictures of the inside, but maybe it also adds to the allure.

  3. I agree Sherry – seeing photos makes me want to go to a place even more. I never say that i have been if i only read an article about it.

  4. Sherry
    |

    I think when photography is forbidden (especially when there is no flash anyway), its usually because they want you to go there in person instead of living it through the photography of others. Of course there are exceptions to this theory. In the end, I think photography gives a place free advertisement and would usually help to promote people to go to that destination. Its disadvantageous to prohibit it, especially in today’s digital age.

  5. May sounds good. See you then

  6. phil + Di marina gateway
    |

    oh no we did the road into the park is very bad and we were on a scooter so it WAS bad i didnt think my behind would ever get over it
    we would like to go again next year you can walk right through it to the millie park but it was just to hot in aug were over again next year in may so we might do the walk then your welcome to join us .x

  7. I don’t understand it , if the reason is because of flash photography as now many cameras have the functions for you to take picture indoors with the flash off

  8. They did not give a reason Di but it is normally because they say constant flash over a long time will deteriorate the antiques. Sorry to miss you when you was here, will have to catch up next time. We never did make it to Dilek Park

  9. Angela
    |

    While sometimes I understand why photography is forbidden, most of the times I don’t, especially in public places.
    This house looks very nice, from outside at least 😉

  10. phil + Di marina gateway
    |

    Hiya Natalie just catching up with your blog i have missed it while we,ve been away
    im realy enjoying reading about the black sea and all the places you have been to around the area
    i hate it when we cant take photos there’s not many places that stop you now did they say why you cant take photos

  11. Tried that before Peter but in Turkey, they generally don’t recognise bloggers. For the Dolmabahce palace, I bought postcards and scanned them but they were not selling any for this place. Never mind, I suppose it is the experience of seeing it that counts.

  12. Look forward to reading about your travels Carolyn. The black sea region is very different from our neck of the woods. It is so beautiful.

  13. Tried it Alan but the clicking sound won’t go away

  14. Peter
    |

    I generally respect the no camera rule. I personally think that if photos are prohibited its for a reason: copyright, indigenous cultural issues or protection of artifacts – flash or no flash. If your desperate to take photos, why not write/talk to the marketing manager and say your doing a spiel on it. They may or may not let you take photos, but they may also give you promotional material if they wont let you. Happy travels!

  15. Carolyn Seddon
    |

    Hi Natalie, always love seeing your pictures and reading your stories, This is a beautiful house and when Dave and I go on our travels we will try to visit this pavillion.

  16. Alan
    |

    . . certainly a nice looking place. Getting photos without anyone noticing can often be achieved if you go into your settings and turn off sound effects.